Heavu duty industrial axial fan ventilators, large vaneaxial and tubeaxial fans, high temperature duct fans, stainless steel inline axial fan ventilators.
Canadian blower fans

HEAVY DUTY AXIAL FANS

Canada Blower Heavy Duty Axial fans are available available in three basic designs: types AP N and AN N are power plant axial fans designed for larger fossil fuel boilers, especially when reduced load requirements will be encountered. Type MA Adjustax-able axial fans are designed to deliver high capacities (to 900,000 cfm) and medium to high pressures (to 20" total pressure in single stage, to 40" total pressure in two stage) for a variety of industrial process and ventilation applications.

Canada Blower duct fans, tubeaxial fans, vaneaxial fans, roof ventilators and wall propeller fans are found throughout the world operating in industrial processes where performance, reliability and maintainability are of paramount importance. Ranging in diameter from 6 inches to over 9.3 m, and with a variety of impeller designs, control systems and layout options, they form a comprehensive series of axial fans to satisfy virtually all industrial applications. The majority of the fans we supply can be grouped into four broad categories: with fixed pitch fan props, with variable pitch fan props, with mixed flow props, and two stage ventilator props. All are supplied to the same exacting standards, capable of moving from a few hundred cubic feet per minute, to heavy duty adjustable pitch props with capacities up to 900,000 CFM and with static pressures from 0 " Water Gauge (WG) to 40" " WG.

Canada Blower axial flow fans are best buy for many industrial air moving jobs. Generally, an axial ventilator costs considerable less than a quality centrifugal fan delivering the same volume and pressure. They cost less to install since they are lighter, requiring minimum structural support. They can be duct mounted, taking up little space. Direct drive fan  models mean faster start-up and the abscence of V-belt drive and fan bearings lowers maintenance costs.

Adjustax-able VaneAxials feature an adjustable pitch blade fan wheel that permits matching your pressure/volume requirements exactly, and lets you make on-the-job adjustments to compensate for system changes.

Type B Axilas have fixed ventilator blade wheels in capacities up to 300,000 cfm and to 5" total pressure.

The Aeroline swing-out fans are efficient low moise level fans where the entire rotating assembly swings out for fan maintenance.

                                                   







wall propeller fan

 














The phenomena of both sound and vibration are very similar and related. The term “sound” is used for air or other gas while “vibration” is used for a similar disturbance of motion in a solid. The sound pressure disturbance impacting on a solid can impart a vibration while the vibration of a solid can result in sound. Some prefer to call the concept of vibration which results in sound “structure borne noise.”

There are two types of noise problems — those that we anticipate from our sound ratings and those emanating from some abnormal condition in the fan. Some of the more common sources of abnormal or unanticipated noise are:

1) Fan wheel unbalance.
2) Resonance of fan or attached components.
3) Rotating components rubbing on stationary parts.
4) Failing, misaligned, or contaminated bearings (on the fan or on the motor).
5) Air leakage. This can allow sound leakage and also generate a whistle-type noise.
6) Belts slipping.
7) Coupling misalignment.
8) Motor noise, especially with improper power supply. Inverter drives may increase motor noise at certain speeds.
9) Air turbulence.
10) Operation in surge.
11) Loose components.
12) High velocity air blowing over fixed components which are not part of the fan.

The other class of noise problems are those we have anticipated because of normal fan sound ratings. Some cures for these problems are:

- Select a different fan. Computerized selection routines allow us to examine many fan types looking for the quietest. Use a custom fan design, if required.
- Relocate the fan to where sound is not a problem.
- Vibration isolation and flexible connectors on the inlet and discharge will reduce structure-borne noise.
- Insulate or acoustically enclose the fan housing if housing radiated noise is a problem.
- Add silencers or duct lining to inlet and / or discharge to reduce sound in these directions. However, a silencer on the outlet does not reduce the housing radiated noise or inlet noise; and an inlet silencer does not affect the housing radiated and/or outlet noise.
- Look for ways to reduce system resistance since sound output is proportional to fan static pressure.

One final tip which can help to avoid noise problems is to select lower RPM fans. Fans exceeding 3000 RPM are much more likely to tune in to an attached structure resulting in structure borne noise. Structure borne noise easily propagates an entire system and can become a problem at many locations. Also, people tend to become more annoyed with higher frequencies than with lower, increasing the likelihood of a noise problem.

Recently, several changes are developing in the technology of fan noise. Some of these are:

1. The latest codes define testing for fan inlet noise, fan outlet noise, and noise radiating from the housing (or casing). The inlet noise can no longer be assumed to apply to the outlet and vice-versa.
2. A new test code which uses sound intensity is near adaption. In theory, integrating a series of measured sound intensities over an enclosed area yields the sound power directly.
3. Sound criteria is playing an ever more important role in the selection process. Many fans are insulated for sound or use other sound reduction apparatus.
4. Active noise cancellation continues to be difficult to apply to most fan installations. If it ever proves practical, this technique can cancel fan noise by adding a second pressure wave out of phase with the original.
5. Many more fan specifications are requiring AMCA sound certification. Certified sound ratings mean that AMCA has verified that the ratings are generated in accordance with the codes and that at least one sample has been tested in the AMCA Laboratory to verify the ratings.

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